As well as being a superb and nourishing food and rich in protein, vitamins and minerals, Regal Salmon is a natural source of healthy Omega-3s, of which the known health benefits are many and affect the body, and mind.

Body Food

Long chain omega-3s have important heart health benefits by improving blood flow to the heart and lowering harmful blood fats.

Long chain omega-3s may be beneficial for the joints as they have powerful anti-inflammatory properties.

Dietary guidelines recommend we consume 1 to 2 oily fish meals per week to meet our needs for long chain omega-3s. Regal Salmon is one of the richest marine sources.

View Sources

NHFA Position statement. Dietary fats and dietary cholesterol for cardiovascular health 2009.
Visit NFHA website.

Omega-3 Centre Consensus Report, Omega-3 fatty acids for baby boomers, October 2008

Baby Food

DHA (one of the long chain omega-3s) is vital for the development of the growing baby’s brain, eyes and nervous system.

To achieve adequate DHA intake, pregnant* and breastfeeding women should aim to consume at least 200mg DHA per day – this is equivalent to 1 to 2 oily fish meals (such as Regal Salmon and sardines) per week.

For further advice on seafood and pregnancy*, go to the FSANZ website

*Pregnant women should avoid eating pre-cooked seafood products (unless eaten hot) and uncooked seafoods.

View Sources

Koletzko, B et al The roles of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnancy, lactation and infancy: review of current knowledge and consensus recommendations J.Perinat.Med.36(2008) 5-14

Omega-3 Centre Consensus Report, Omega-3 fatty acids for maternal and infant health and development, November 2009

   

Mind Food

Omega-3 fatty acids found in salmon are essential components of brain cell membranes, and their role in cell structure is thought to improve the powers of memory and boost learning power.

Long chain omega-3s play an important role in the normal development and function of the brain. Increasing evidence indicates that a deficiency in omega-3s in early childhood may contribute to behaviour and learning difficulties in children.

View Sources

Koletzko, B et al The roles of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in pregnancy, lactation and infancy: review of current knowledge and consensus recommendations J.Perinat.Med.36(2008) 5-14

Omega-3 Centre Consensus Report, Omega-3 fatty acids – essential nutrients for our children, August 2007

Omega-3 Centre Consensus Report, Omega-3 fatty acids for maternal and infant health and development, November 2009